“He Restrained Them Not”

“He Restrained Them Not”

by James Sanders

The life of the Old Testament figure, Eli, is indeed a remarkable one.  Eli was a descendant of Ithamar, the fourth son of Aaron and therefore was of the tribe of Levi. Combined in this man of God were the offices of both High Priest and Judge. It was the first time in Israel that one man had held both offices at the same time. But such was indicative of the goodness and righteousness of Eli; it seems everyone respected him. For some forty years Eli judged the nation of Israel (Cf. 1 Sam. 4.18). His character was one of godliness and devotion but was not without blemish. Phineas and Hophni, the sons of Eli, were as wicked as their father was righteous. And to make matters worse, Phineas and Hophni were put into the office of a priest even though they lacked Eli’s virtue and zeal (Cf. 1 Sam 1:3). The result was nothing short of extraordinary! The conduct of Eli’s children literally shocked the people of Israel. Because of Phineas and Hophni,

men came to abhor the offering of the Lord (Cf. 1 Sam 2.17). Things were very bad; the sad state of affairs was almost beyond description.

But when the aged High Priest learned of the scandals being committed by his sons, he only administered a gentle rebuke. Apparently Eli had always so corrected his children. Instead of reproving his boys while they were small, Eli perhaps reasoned with them and viewed their mischievous conduct with but a look of disfavor. But now Phineas and Hophni were no longer children and with them had grown their mischievous habits. The Scriptures assert that Eli was largely to blame. “He restrained them not” (I Sam 3.13). Eli had failed to restrain his sons while they were young and now it was too-late! As the twig had been bent, so had it grown. Now the sternest rebuke would prove ineffectual. Alas! What a lifetime of waste! All those years of effort and sacrifice in vain. Eli had failed and failed miserably; he had let his sons down when they needed him the most!

The Scriptures urge: “Chasten thy son while there is hope, and let not thy soul spare for his crying” (Prov. 19.18). Doubtless, Eli’s philosophy was, “Boys will be boys.” But someone has well said, “Boys will be boys, but those same boys one day will be men.” A child needs discipline and guidance when he is young. Then there is hope. Parents, open your eyes before it is too late! Now is the time to “restrain” your children. Now is the time to bring them up in the nurture and admonition of the Lord. This opportunity of youth, once present, never returns. Father or mother, have you really “restrained” (guided) that wee creature who is so fresh from God? Be honest with yourself.  Think of Eli – think of yourself – think of the little ones entrusted to your care. Will you fail them when they need you the most?

“He Restrained Them Not”

“He Restrained Them Not”

by James Sanders

The life of the Old Testament figure, Eli, is indeed a remarkable one.  Eli was a descendant of Ithamar, the fourth son of Aaron and therefore was of the tribe of Levi. Combined in this man of God were the offices of both High Priest and Judge. It was the first time in Israel that one man had held both offices at the same time. But such was indicative of the goodness and righteousness of Eli; it seems everyone respected him. For some forty years Eli judged the nation of Israel (Cf. 1 Sam. 4.18). His character was one of godliness and devotion but was not without blemish. Phineas and Hophni, the sons of Eli, were as wicked as their father was righteous. And to make matters worse, Phineas and Hophni were put into the office of a priest even though they lacked Eli’s virtue and zeal (Cf. 1 Sam 1:3). The result was nothing short of extraordinary! The conduct of Eli’s children literally shocked the people of Israel. Because of Phineas and Hophni,

men came to abhor the offering of the Lord (Cf. 1 Sam 2.17). Things were very bad; the sad state of affairs was almost beyond description.

But when the aged High Priest learned of the scandals being committed by his sons, he only administered a gentle rebuke. Apparently Eli had always so corrected his children. Instead of reproving his boys while they were small, Eli perhaps reasoned with them and viewed their mischievous conduct with but a look of disfavor. But now Phineas and Hophni were no longer children and with them had grown their mischievous habits. The Scriptures assert that Eli was largely to blame. “He restrained them not” (I Sam 3.13). Eli had failed to restrain his sons while they were young and now it was too-late! As the twig had been bent, so had it grown. Now the sternest rebuke would prove ineffectual. Alas! What a lifetime of waste! All those years of effort and sacrifice in vain. Eli had failed and failed miserably; he had let his sons down when they needed him the most!

The Scriptures urge: “Chasten thy son while there is hope, and let not thy soul spare for his crying” (Prov. 19.18). Doubtless, Eli’s philosophy was, “Boys will be boys.” But someone has well said, “Boys will be boys, but those same boys one day will be men.” A child needs discipline and guidance when he is young. Then there is hope. Parents, open your eyes before it is too late! Now is the time to “restrain” your children. Now is the time to bring them up in the nurture and admonition of the Lord. This opportunity of youth, once present, never returns. Father or mother, have you really “restrained” (guided) that wee creature who is so fresh from God? Be honest with yourself.  Think of Eli – think of yourself – think of the little ones entrusted to your care. Will you fail them when they need you the most?

Jackson Elementary – District #24, Jackson, MT

OLD SCHOOL OF THE DAY

Jackson School, MT 278

Jackson Elementary – District #24

PO Box 787

415 Jardine Ave.

Jackson, MT 59736

Jackson is an unincorporated community in Beaverhead County, Montana, United States. Although it is unincorporated, Jackson has a post office with a ZIP code of 59736. It lies on Montana Secondary Highway 278 south of Wisdom and northwest of Dillon  Far away from any neighborhoods, the town dates to the 1880s, as  this area of the Big Hole Valley opened up to ranching. Its name came from Anton Jackson, the first postmaster. Jackson grows significantly during the winter, as it is an increasingly popular winter get-away destination, centered on the historic Jackson Hot Springs, which had been upgraded and significantly expanded since 1984. The town still has a historic post office building even though its population barely tops 50.  That is enough, once kids from surrounding ranches are added, to support the Jackson elementary school–a key to the town’s survival over the years. In 2001, its first year in the Montana Heritage Project, the Montana History class of Beaverhead High School in Dillon undertaking the ambitious project of gathering the history and documenting the present of the small country schools in the area. On Halloween, nine students under the direction of teacher Jerry Girard visited the one-room school at Polaris (35 miles northwest of Dillon) and the two-room schools at Jackson, Wisdom, and Grant.

Blackhead One Room School, Cape Spear, Newfoundland, Canada

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blackhead-newfoundland

Blackhead One Room School and Church Museum

8 Blackhead Village Road

Blackhead, Cape Spear, Newfoundland, Canada

Located in Blackhead village, near Cape Spear on the outskirts of St. John’s, NL, is a beautifully restored one room school and church originally constructed in 1879 as a school but soon had a dual-function as a school and church known as St. Joseph’s Chapel for the Roman Catholic community of Blackhead.. The Blackhead One Room School and Church Museum is located in a wooden structure that highlights the built heritage of Blackhead and the history of the community.  A friendly guide will show the school bell that the teacher would ring to summon the children to class and the wooden desks. A wealth of family history is stored in the genealogy exhibit which also includes a self-guided walking tour. As visitors relax on the bench in the yard In the spring, a scatter iceberg can be spotted in the Bay.  The Blackhead One Room School and Church Museum was established to preserve and interpret the cultural history of the community of Blackhead near Cape Spear. The museum, governed by the Chapel Restoration Committee – Blackhead, Cape Spear Inc., preserves built history, collects, interprets, and records historical information and artifacts relating to the Blackhead.  The museum provides interpretation through exhibits and displays, online information, and tours. It will serve the people currently residing in Blackhead, descendants of Blackhead, people who share an interest and curiosity of cultural heritage, especially students, all other people of the province, and visitors to the province.

Polaris School, Polaris, MT

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polaris-montana

Polaris School

4210 Pioneer Mountains Scenic Byway

Polaris, MT  59746

Polaris School is a rural, public school that serves students in kindergarten through eighth grade.  The historic one-room schoolhouse sits alone at the base the Pioneer Mountains in rural southwest Montana on a windy, scenic byway with a few mailboxes and even fewer buildings dotting the road. There’s no cellphone service, and there’s no town. Yet the small ranching community produces enough children for the school to educate.  Enrollment typically ranges from 3 to 8 students. If it closes, it will mean an hour commute for the remaining students.  In 2001, its first year in the Montana Heritage Project, the Montana History class at Beaverhead High School in Dillon, MT, undertook the ambitious project of gathering the history and documenting the present of the small country schools in the area. On Halloween, nine students under the direction of teacher Jerry Girard visited the one-room school at Polaris (35 miles northwest of Dillon).

St John’s Schoolhouse Museum, Reid, ACT (Australian Capital Territory), Australia

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St_John's_Schoolhouse_Museum_canberra

St John’s Schoolhouse Museum

45 Constitution Ave.

Reid, ACT (Australian Capital Territory), 2612, Australia

Visitors can take a step back in time to the days of slate boards, slate pencils, blackboards, chalk, and inkwells and get in touch with Canberra’s early history at the St John’s Schoolhouse Museum, situated adjacent to the historic St John’s Church and churchyard.   Canberra’s first schoolhouse was built in 1845 by Robert Campbell of Duntroon for the education of workers’ children. Consisting of a schoolroom with five attached rooms it served as the residence for the schoolmaster and his family.  The building was constructed from rubble and bluestone quarried locally, with shingle roof and the walls being two feet thick to afford protection from Canberra’s harsh climate.  Children walked across the fields to attend school and pioneering families on the school roll include the Blundell children who lived in Blundell’s Cottage, one of the few stone buildings of its type to have survived intact in the ACT.  The school’s first 30 or so years were far from easy. Suitable teachers were hard to attract to small rural communities and retaining them was difficult. Reports from teachers during these early years reflected the hardships they experienced, including meager funding and social isolation.  The Schoolhouse finally closed as a school in 1907 and in 1969 it opened as a museum. It is set up to depict schooling in the 1870s.  Today’s children like to ring the school bell, sit at the old desks, gaze at photographs of 19th century school pupils and play simple but entertaining children’s games of an earlier age.  Visitors will find extensive photographic displays which show the growth and development of Canberra from a scattered farming community to the national capital.  Scrapbooks dating from 1954 to the present are held at the Schoolhouse. They consist of newspaper cuttings, brochures, photos, letters and journal articles relating to the Schoolhouse, St John’s Church, other Canberra churches, the Campbell family and the history of Canberra. Royal visits, heritage issues and other local interest stories are also included.  The museum is staffed by volunteers and is open on Wednesdays 10.00 am to Noon and Saturdays and Sundays 2.00 pm to 4.00 pm.  School excursions and group tours at other times are by arrangement.

Hogan one room Schoolhouse, Luther, MT

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hogan-montana

Hogan one room Schoolhouse

Montana Route 78

Luther, Montana

The Hogan School is a turn of the twentieth century delight, the model one-room schoolhouse design of that period.  The Hogan one room schoolhouse is located along Montana Route 78 near the town of Luther in Carbon County, 6 or 7 miles out of Reg Lodge.  Along Highway 78, the watchful may spot this little red and white schoolhouse set back from the north side of the road.  The name of the community here is “Castagne,” The only reference found to Castagne is the Castagne Cemetery, about 5.33 miles north-northeast, as the crow flies.  The Hogan family had established the county’s first rural school in 1887.  At least, according to the sign above the door, this later building was in use and served the surrounding ranch kids from 1895 until 1967.  From that time, school consolidation forced the kids to bus to Red Lodge school for their learning.  Its preservation today is an excellent example of local stewardship by the property owner.  A perfectly typical little wood framed, gable roofed one room schoolhouse, though it is now simply a local historic site, it has, to some extent at least, been taken care of by the locals. Its last coat of paint is now a few decades old, but the door has been boarded and nailed shut to prevent entry. The schoolhouse stands in a corral in which a pair of friendly horses graze.