Home » Uncategorized » T. B. Boyer and his Joyce’s 71st New York Regiment March

T. B. Boyer and his Joyce’s 71st New York Regiment March

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Thornton Barnes Boyer (1856-1936) was born at Phoenixville, PA, in 1856 to John Boyer (1831-1863) and Mary Ann Reinard Boyer (1832-Unknown).    He married Ella Clarissa Bailey (1861-1937).  They had three children: Thornton Bailey Boyer (1886-1931); John Cedric Boyer (1888-1950); and Theodore Ross Boyer (1894-1953).  While living in Philadelphia, PA, he was employed by the J.W. Pepper Music Company to arrange, compile and compose music.  His works include The B & O March, for band, and the American National Waltz, for brass ensemble (1880), but his most famous march is Joyce’s 71st New York Regiment March composed in 1881 and still being performed by bands today.  The Joyce’s 71st N. Y. Regiment Band, to whom this march was dedicated, was one of several well-known New York military bands in the nineteenth century.

The march was altered by the arranger Mayhew Lake, with the addition of a euphonium countermelody and some of the rhythmic patterns.  After having written music for the 225th anniversary of Philadelphia in 1907, Boyer moved to Pleasantville, IL, where he was music director for the 6th Illinois Regiment band, and then to Keokuk, IA, where he occupied a similar position with the 50th Iowa Volunteer regiment band.  Later he relocated to Santa Monica, CA.  During his lifetime, he composed hundreds of musical works including many other band marches.  His death occurred on Apr. 28, 1936, in Los Angeles County, CA.

The following work by T. B. Boyer is contained in my collection:

Joyce’s 71st New York Regiment March.

—material selected, adapted, and edited from several different sources

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2 thoughts on “T. B. Boyer and his Joyce’s 71st New York Regiment March

  1. I would assume that it was evidently the name given to the 71st Infantry Regiment, an organization of the New York State Guard, formerly of the New York State Militia and then of the Army National Guard from 1850 to 1993, probably after a founder or major leader of the unit. That’s all I can guess.

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