Home » Uncategorized » HEADSUP Homeschooling newsletter

HEADSUP Homeschooling newsletter

     Here are the heading, table of contents, and opening article for the 5/06 issue of my free monthly e-mail homeschooling newsletter.  If anyone is interested in receiving the entire newsletter each month, just contact me at the e-mail address in the heading.


 


HOMESCHOOL EDUCATORS ON ACTIVE DUTY, SENDING UPWARD PRAISES
Monthly newsletter of general interest, encouragement,
and information for homeschooling Christians
% Wayne S. Walker, 9024 Amona Dr., Affton (St. Louis), MO  63123
E-mail: wswalker310@juno.com; phones: (314) 638-4710 home, 544-1612 office
May, 2006; Volume 8, Number 10
#################################################################
TABLE OF CONTENTS (Part 1)
1. MISCELLANIA: THIS AND THAT, BITS AND PIECES, ODDS AND ENDS by Wayne S. Walker
2. HOMESCHOOLS RUN BY WELL-MEANING AMATEURS: Schools With Good Teachers Are Best-Suited to Shape Young Minds By Dave Arnold
3. RESPONSE TO “WELL MEANING AMATEURS” from Various Sources
4. HOME EDUCATED AND NOW ADULTS: Their Community and Civic Involvement, Views About Homeschooling, and Other Traits by Brian D. Ray, Ph.D.
5. ARROGANCE OF PUBLIC SCHOOL from the blog of DannyHSDad
6. UC SYSTEM SUED FOR ALLEGED DISCRIMINATION AGAINST CHRISTIAN-BASED BELIEFS By Jim Brown and Jody Brown
7. EIGHT CHILDREN MADE TO SLEEP IN CAGES; PARENTS DENY NEGLECT By Jim Bobel
8. WHAT DOES “BACK TO SCHOOL” MEAN FOR HOMESCHOOLERS from att.net
9. THE BENEFITS OF HOMESCHOOLING from The Teaching Home E-Newsletter
10. DEALING WITH LONELINESS AND OTHER HOMESCHOOLING PROBLEMS by Zan Tyler
11. DR. PHIL HELPS COUPLE DECIDE: The Glen Rock Parents went on TV to weigh the merits of homeschooling by Brent Burkey
#################################################################
1. MISCELLANIA: THIS AND THAT, BITS AND PIECES, ODDS AND ENDS
by Wayne S. Walker
     As previously announced, instead of ending this newsletter in July of this year, as once decided, it will continue on Yahoogroups.  Since it will no longer be ceasing, I am making a change in the theme for this month to give me a little time to recoup and determine where I want to go with the newsletter.  Over the last couple of years I have collected various articles, items, and other material about homeschooling from different sources.  I have not used them thus far because some past newsletters were SO LONG and I have been trying to cut down.  This issue of the newsletter, therefore, is devoted solely to these things.  Some of them you may have seen on homeschooling e-mail lists, websites, and other sources.  However, by bringing them all here together, they will be available in a permanent form.
     Let me make a few random observations about homeschooling.  I am a homeschooling father.  While I do not feel that it is my job to be an enthusiastic evangelizer for homeschooling, believing that this is a decision that each family must make for itself, I am a passionate defender of it.  I love the homeschooling lifestyle.  I like the fact that my wife and I are able to teach our children in the way that best suits their needs using materials that are consistent with our faith.  I enjoy having more time that we can spend doing things together rather than being torn asunder by outside activities.  However, I do not offer homeschooling as a be-all, end-all, cure-all.  Barb Frank calls herself “The Imperfect Homeschooler,” and in spite of all those pictures of the “perfect homeschool family,” I think that most of us would honestly admit that we are not perfect.
     We have tried to approach homeschooling in such a way that not only would our children benefit from it but also they would enjoy it.  Unfortunately, we have not always done that perfectly.  It is a delicate balance that challenges children to do their best and yet does not put undue pressure upon them.  We would like for our children to see the need of the course of study that we have laid out for them and do it willingly, but children do not always do what they should willingly.  They do not always go to the doctor and take their medicine willingly, but we make them do it anyway.  They do not always see the dentist or the optometrist willingly, but we make them go anyway.  They do not always do their lessons willingly, but we make them work at it anyway.
     We may try to make learning as “fun” and enjoyable as possible, but, admittedly, memorizing arithmetic tables, doing grammar assignments, practicing penmanship, and such things are not always “fun.”  Then again, neither is taking medicine or going to the dentist.  But there are certain things that are foundational–to education or good health–that must be done whether they are enjoyable or not.  We can try to be as positive and encouraging as we can (some parents are better at this than others), but our children also need to learn that there are some situations where they just have to bite the bullet, knuckle down, and get the job done, whether they like it or not.  Our hope as parents is that, when they grow older and their understanding matures, they will see that what we did was in their best interest and come to appreciate the efforts that we put forth.
     The articles that follow contain both passionate defenses of homeschooling and gentle reminders of our need as homeschooling parents to be patient and do our best.
##########################################################################

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s